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Cryopreservation of microalgae Chlamydomonas meslinii

cells Chlamydomonas meslinii | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

For the cryopreservation of microalgae. Protocol has been adapted from Muller, et al. (2007).


Cryopreservation of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris

cells Chlorella vulgaris | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

For the cryopreservation of microalgae. Protocol has been adapted from Muller, et al. (2007).


Cryopreservation of Primary Cells from Human Tissue

Primary cells Homo sapiens | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This simple protocol is for the cryopreservation of disaggregated primary cells from human tissue samples. It is adapted from Current Protocols in Cytometry. The protocol stores the cells at -70°C, and notes that cells can be stored at this temperature for 4 – 6 months. It makes no mention of longer-term storage at cryogenic temperatures.


Cryopreservation of Baird’s Tapir (Tapirus bairdii) Sperm

Spermatozoa (sperm) Tapirus bairdii | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This protocol is reported in an article describing ejaculate traits of the endangered Baird’s Tapir (Tapirus bairdii). The authors note that while this protocol is generally successful, it does lead to a statistically significant decrease in sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.


Cryopreservation of WRL-68 cells (hepatic fetal human epithelial cells), optimized for cryoptotectant

WRL-68 cells (hepatic fetal human epithelial cells) Homo sapiens | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This protocol came from a paper that sought to find a cryoprotectant that minimized cell toxicity and also minimizing the mean ice grain size when cryopreserved. Human WRL-68 cells (hepatic fetal human epithelial cells) were used. While the post-thaw viability was not actually assessed, it was presumed that the protocol with the smallest ice grain size would provide the greatest post-thaw viability. They found that 220mM Lactose was a very well-performing cryoprotectant (see fig. 5 in the paper), and this is what we report.


Xeno-free, Chemically Defined PBMC Cryopreservation

Peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC) Homo sapiens | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

The article this protocol was published in sought to characterize a xeno-free and fully chemically defined cryopreservation medium for use with PBMC. The authors found that the new medium had a comparable cryopreservation efficiency after short-term storage and after 6 months. Longer durations were not tested. Viabilities of over 97% and recoveries over 84% were obtained.

It may be worth noting that the authors of this study are from the institute that, at the time of publication, had already licensed this cryopreservation media to Fischer Procryotect for commercial sale.


High-Throughput Cryopreservation of Nicotiana tabacum Cell Culture

Cell line BY-2 Nicotiana tabacum | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This protocol was taken from a paper that sought to develop a high-throughput method for cryopreservation of 5 commonly used plant model organisms. Using this protocol, over 100 samples are able to be prepared for cryopreservation prior to freezing without significant loss of cell viability, thereby allowing more efficient prep of larger volumes of samples.


Cryopreservation of Gilthead Seabream (Sparus aurata) Sperm

Spermatozoa / sperm Sparus aurata | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This protocol is taken from a paper in which the authors attempted to create an optimized cryopreservation protocol which minimized changes in plasma membrane lipid composition, as changes in plasma membrane lipid composition have been related to a decrease in sperm quality during cryopreservation. To achieve this, they use the antifreeze protein AFPIII.


High-Throughput Cryopreservation of Oryza sativa Cell Culture

L. cv. Sasanishki Oryza sativa | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This protocol was taken from a paper that sought to develop a high-throughput method for cryopreservation of 5 commonly used plant model organisms. Using this protocol, over 100 samples are able to be prepared for cryopreservation prior to freezing without significant loss of cell viability, thereby allowing more efficient prep of larger volumes of samples.


General Cryopreservation Protocol for In Vitro Cultured Cells

In vitro cultured cells or hybridomas n/a n/a | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This general protocol for the cryopreservation of cell lines or hybridomas is adapted from an appendix in Current Protocols in Immunology and was last published in 2001. It is highly recommended that if you follow this protocol you optimize its parameters for your cell type.


Cryopreservation of Primary Hepatocytes

Primary hepatocytes (liver cells) n/a n/a | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This protocol is adapted from current protocols in toxicology and is for the cryopreservation of primary hepatocytes from any laboratory animal. It is not species-specific and may therefore require optimization for best results.


Cryopreservation of Human Red Blood Cells (Erythrocytes)

Erythrocytes (red blood cells) Homo sapiens | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This protocol utilizes an ice-binding protein from the Arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. (LeIBP) that is created in a Pichia expression system. The use of LeIBP significantly reduced freeze-thaw-induced hemolysis and better preserved cell size distribution.


High-Throughput Cryopreservation of Lotus japonicus Cell Culture

Larsen ecotype Gifu cells Lotus japonicus | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This protocol was taken from a paper that sought to develop a high-throughput method for cryopreservation of 5 commonly used plant model organisms. Using this protocol, over 100 samples are able to be prepared for cryopreservation prior to freezing without significant loss of cell viability, thereby allowing more efficient prep of larger volumes of samples.


Cryopreservation of methane-oxidizing bacteria Methylosinus trichosporium

type II, strain NCIMB 11131T Methylosinus trichosporium | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

For the preservation of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) to increase viability and culturability 3 to 12 months after cryopreservation. Adapted from Hoefman et al. (2012).


For the cryopreservation of bovine spermatogonial stem cells after culture in vitro. This protocol utilizes bovine embryonic fibroblasts (BEF) as feeder cells in co-culture with bovine germ cells. The cryopreservation of in vitro cultured of sperm may be useful for research into male germ line fertility, regulatory factors of male fertility, as well as a means of preservation of a male germ line, or increased genetic gain within domestic herds. The addition of exogenous glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) allows for increased the maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells in vitro. The following protocol has been adapted from Oatley, et al (2004b).


High-Throughput Cryopreservation of Arabidopsis thaliana Cell Culture

Columbia cell line T87 Arabidopsis thaliana | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

This protocol was taken from a paper that sought to develop a high-throughput method for cryopreservation of 5 commonly used plant model organisms. Using this protocol, over 100 samples are able to be prepared for cryopreservation prior to freezing without significant loss of cell viability, thereby allowing more efficient prep of larger volumes of samples.


This protocol is actually an alternative to cryopreservation that does not involve freezing and is suitable for short-term storage of human spermatozoa. The authors were attempting to minimize the loss of sperm motility and also minimize DNA fragmentation. The authors report that for short-term storage (1 week) this protocol performs significantly better than cryopreservation with regard to both metrics.


Whole Ovine (Sheep) Ovary Cryopreservation

Whole ovary Ovis aries | Rating: 100.00 (1 / 0 ) View Protocol

The authors of the paper from which this protocol is adopted noted that it is not perfect. Ki67 expression was reduced following cryopreservation, suggesting that cellular proliferation is reduced. Cryopreservation also caused arterial endothelial disruption. It is possible that there may be other negative effects that were not observed by the authors, however the results as a whole were called “encouraging for whole ovary cryopreservation, demonstrating maintained cell viability”.


This protocol was taken from a paper that sought to develop a high-throughput method for cryopreservation of 5 commonly used plant model organisms. Using this protocol, over 100 samples are able to be prepared for cryopreservation prior to freezing without significant loss of cell viability, thereby allowing more efficient prep of larger volumes of samples.


Cryopreservation of microalgae Coelastrum morum

microalgae Coelastrum morum | Rating: 0 (0 / 0 ) View Protocol

For the cryopreservation of microalgae. Protocol has been adapted from Muller, et al. (2007).


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